Where communities thrive


  • Join over 1.5M+ people
  • Join over 100K+ communities
  • Free without limits
  • Create your own community
People
Repo info
Activity
  • Oct 18 14:45
    he2lec closed #308
  • Oct 18 14:17
    he2lec opened #308
  • Oct 18 07:17
    P-NA-J closed #306
  • Oct 18 07:17
    P-NA-J commented #306
  • Oct 17 17:42
    Snaipe commented #306
  • Oct 17 17:37
    ntuDerekWang closed #307
  • Oct 17 17:37
    ntuDerekWang commented #307
  • Oct 17 17:34
    Snaipe commented #307
  • Oct 17 17:28
    ntuDerekWang edited #307
  • Oct 17 17:28
    ntuDerekWang edited #307
  • Oct 17 17:26
    ntuDerekWang opened #307
  • Oct 17 17:23
    ntuDerekWang closed #305
  • Oct 17 17:23
    ntuDerekWang commented #305
  • Oct 17 07:32
    vincentdupaquis commented #304
  • Oct 16 12:25
    P-NA-J opened #306
  • Oct 14 08:44
    Snaipe commented #304
  • Oct 14 07:41
    vincentdupaquis commented #304
  • Oct 12 17:28
    Snaipe commented #304
  • Oct 12 12:13
    Snaipe commented #304
  • Oct 12 11:43
    Snaipe commented #305
Ben Turrubiates
@bturrubiates
oh, so they found a new maintainer?
oh, that’s good.
Franklin Mathieu
@Snaipe
Well we expected someone to step up, but no one did and the project was considered "dead"
I was considering changing for something else at that time, but surprisingly there wasn't any good fit
ZeroMQ is mainly C++ and I'd like the project to remain C-only (plus it wasn't fork-safe, whereas I made a patch for nanomsg to make it fork-safe)
I have a bit more liberty with regards to switching libraries now though, as the new sandbox code calls exec() and doesn't require fork safety
Ben Turrubiates
@bturrubiates
when you say sandbox are you referring to boxfort?
Franklin Mathieu
@Snaipe
yes
Ben Turrubiates
@bturrubiates
oh cool, i saw that but haven’t looked very much into it. looks interesting though
Franklin Mathieu
@Snaipe
BoxFort was designed to completely rewrite the sandboxing code of criterion (which consisted of fork() on unices and a reimplementation of fork() on windows)
because it was a real hassle to maintain
BoxFort, on the other hand, provides a solid API for creating sandboxes with copy-on-write data sharing
so not only it is safer & more maintainable, it's also quite fast
Ben Turrubiates
@bturrubiates
oh nice, i’ll take a better look sometime. a while ago i tried looking into mimic, but then realized that a lot of the functions i wanted to mock were static inline
Franklin Mathieu
@Snaipe
ah, yes, that's a shame. I'd like to be able to mock static functions in the future by looking up non-dynamic symbols and patching them, but I'm a bit reluctant as this feature would probably be ELF-only
It's a complete shame that MSVC doesn't export a symbol table for its executables
Ben Turrubiates
@bturrubiates
i have very little experience developing on Windows, but i’ve seen a lot of the changes being made to one of the projects i contribute to as they port it to Windows and it looks frustrating
sometimes you don’t realize how many features are GCC extensions
(by very little i meant none)
Franklin Mathieu
@Snaipe
Maintaining API compatibility with MSVC is quite hard on that aspect, yes
I'm still wondering why people aren't using clang-cl these days
it would solve all of these problems
Ben Turrubiates
@bturrubiates
i actually haven’t heard of clang-cl before
oh, looks like it can even be used from inside visual studio. that does sound like a better alternative...
Franklin Mathieu
@Snaipe
Its quite recent, I stumbled upon it a few months ago
and yes, the big plus is the visual studio integration
Ben Turrubiates
@bturrubiates
well sometimes you interact with windows projects where their main build system is visual studio files committed to a repoo
repo* and it feels kinda…dirty?
Franklin Mathieu
@Snaipe
This is encouraged by the VCS plugin for visual studio though
it versions the projects files with the sources
so for people not using the command line, this is the default behaviour
Ben Turrubiates
@bturrubiates
yeah, it seems pretty normal for VS + Windows development
just seems strange to someone not used to that workflow
Dominik
@kaidowei
@Snaipe hi there :)
we just found a bug/strange behavior with 2.2.2
[----] Warning! The test "ar7config::scg_active3" crashed during its setup or teardown.
[----] Warning! The test "ar7config::scg_delete" crashed during its setup or teardown.
[----] Warning! The test "ar7config::vcc_no_scg1" crashed during its setup or teardown.
[----] Warning! The test "ar7config::vcc_no_scg2" crashed during its setup or teardown.
[====] Synthesis: Tested: 14 | Passing: 14 | Failing: 0 | Crashing: 0
hmm
The return Code of the Tests is 0
which is unfortunate, if we run it with jenkins
Franklin Mathieu
@Snaipe
@kaidowei what are these tests doing during setup and/or teardown?
Also is this happening on v2.3.0-rc1?
Franklin Mathieu
@Snaipe
Looking at your log in more detail, these tests are crashing during teardown. If a test crashes during setup it is immediately marked as failed.
Crashing during teardown does not impact the result of the test
Dominik
@kaidowei
These tests tried to free something and due to a bug in our code, the free crashed.
Fortunately, we ran the tests manually, otherwise we would not have seen that.
so maybe crashing while teardown should also mark the tests as failed?
Franklin Mathieu
@Snaipe
I'm not sure it would be a good design idea since if you enforce that everything has to go right in your teardown then why isn't it part of the test function itself? (Same reasoning as putting assertions in JUnit's @After is considered bad practice)
however I do agree that those warnings should mandate a nonzero exit status
perhaps make Criterion return a nonzero status when at least one warning or error is caught
and introduce something like --ignore-warnings for the original behaviour
Dominik
@kaidowei
Seems reasonable :) :+1: