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    Ben Albrecht
    @ben-albrecht
    OK, the Chapel compiler can be built with multiple configurations simultaneously, that you can switch configuration on the fly with env vars or compiler flags. Switching the env var or using the compiler flag —comm={none, gasnet} (and using different -o names to avoid overwriting each other obviously) is a reasonable approach.
    Michael Merrill
    @mhmerrill
    ok, i was afraid I was going to have to make clean and rebuild completely
    Brad Chamberlain
    @bradcray
    @mhmerrill: To put a bit more detail into Ben’s response: The chapel compiler itself is independent of whether it’s built with CHPL_COMM=none or gasnet or whatever. The runtime is not. So if you look under your $CHPL_HOME/bin/ directory, you’ll see a small amount of uniquification due to platform, architecture, etc. but most configurations will share the same path to chpl and binary. Whereas in the $CHPL_HOME/lib directory, you’ll see a lot more diversity in paths based on each setting of CHPL_COMM, CHPL_TASKS, etc.
    @hokiegeek2: Sorry that I missed your questions last week (I took Th-Fri off). Your notion of wanting to be able to specify where the blocks should start/stop is similar to the “cut” distribution that I mentioned which we’ve had a user proof-of-concept, yet don’t support on master. The big difference between how “cut” and “block” would work, as @thomasrolinger notes, is that “cut” would need to store some sort of "directory structure" indicating how to map from indices to locales whereas for “block” it’s “just math.” This is not a huge deal to implement, simply not something we have today.
    @thomasrolinger’s suggestion about potentially padding the strings such that they block up evenly would be another way to get strings to not be split across locales, but has that tricky chicken-and-egg problem where you have to know your data pretty intimately in order to pad them correctly.
    Brad Chamberlain
    @bradcray
    The other approach (which may or may not be appropriate, depending on your context and constraints) would be Engin’s notion of just letting the strings fall where they may, and then when you do an operation that wants them all to be on a single locale, make sure to get them there by hook or by crook (e.g., “this string is all local, so I’ll just do what I want to it” vs. “this string is split, so let me make a temporary buffer locally to store the whole thing and concatenate my local portion with my neighbor’s portion into that buffer before operating on it”).
    hokiegeek2
    @hokiegeek2
    @bradcray gotcha, cool, good info, thanks for the follow-up!
    Michael Merrill
    @mhmerrill
    has anyone build chapel on the new raspberry pi 4 with 8 GB of RAM???
    Elliot Ronaghan
    @ronawho
    Not on raspberry pi, but we have some nightly testing that builds on machines with 2 and 4 GB RAM
    I don't think arkouda will build with 8GB of RAM though, I think you need 11-12 currently
    Elliot Ronaghan
    @ronawho
    Brian G ran on the 1G boards a few years ago -- https://chapel-lang.org/CHIUW/2015/talks/CHIUW-Chapel_on_ARM_final.pdf
    Damon Kwok
    @damon-kwok
    Why not use zulip?
    Brad Chamberlain
    @bradcray
    Gitter’s worked well for us?
    Damon Kwok
    @damon-kwok
    @bradcray chapel-mode has been completed. Can you give me some feedback?
    Brad Chamberlain
    @bradcray
    I was stuck in meetings most of the day today and didn’t have much chance for experimentation, but will try to download and give it a try tomorrow, if not later tonight.
    Damon Kwok
    @damon-kwok
    NP
    Brad Chamberlain
    @bradcray
    @damon-kwok: Maybe here’s the motivation I needed to do so: This is another case that our current mode does badly with (unparenthesized conditionals):
    if loc == here {
                     writeln(“Hi”);
    }
    Does yours handle this case well?
    Damon Kwok
    @damon-kwok
    @bradcray Yes, the new chapel-mode handles it well.
    It will surprise you
    When you encounter any problem, please let me know and I will solve it quickly
    Brad Chamberlain
    @bradcray
    OK, cool. I’ll use this as motivation to give it a try now.
    Damon Kwok
    @damon-kwok
    @bradcray Fixed: (substitute-key-definition 'c-electric-brace nil chapel-mode-map)
    The same applies to chpl-mode
    Brad Chamberlain
    @bradcray
    @damon-kwok: Is there a way, within an emacs session, to validate that I’m using your emacs mode rather than ours? My emacs-fu is not strong enough to know.
    Damon Kwok
    @damon-kwok
    M-x chapel-mode
    Damon Kwok
    @damon-kwok
    @bradcray Sorry, the last commit introduced a bug, I fixed it, you need to pull the latest code
    Brad Chamberlain
    @bradcray
    Can I save the file as chpl-mode.el, replacing my typical file, in order to avoid having to change my .emacs file until I’m ready to make the switch? Or must the file be called chapel-mode.el in order to work?
    Damon Kwok
    @damon-kwok
    You can still use the file name chpl-mode.el, although this is not a good practice.
    Damon Kwok
    @damon-kwok
    The easier way:
    1. delete your chpl-mode.el.
    2. open chapel-mode.el
    3. M-x package-install-file
    Brad Chamberlain
    @bradcray
    If I do rename it to chpl-mode.el (because I’m lazy and already did that before asking :) ) then is there a way to browse the source within emacs to check that it’s using your file rather than mine?
    (or otherwise query something that would be unique to your version but not ours, like a version number or variable or ...?)
    Damon Kwok
    @damon-kwok
    The highlight of chapel-mode will be very obvious. You can also use C-h m to view the current major mode name
    image.png
    Brad Chamberlain
    @bradcray
    When you say “very obvious” what do you mean?
    Damon Kwok
    @damon-kwok
    image.png
    chpl-mode only has simple highlighting, and chapel-mode highlighting will not miss any characters
    Brad Chamberlain
    @bradcray
    But if I rename your file chpl-mode.el, then C-h m it will list the major mode as chpl-mode.el without making it clear whether it’s yours or mine, right? :)
    Damon Kwok
    @damon-kwok
    chapel-mode.el line 539:
    image.png
    line 539
    you can modify "Chapel" to "Chapel New"
    So you can distinguish between the two
    Brad Chamberlain
    @bradcray
    OK, thanks.
    Brad Chamberlain
    @bradcray
    I ended up giving up on saving it as chpl-mode.el and started hacking on my .emacs instead. I’m running into problems, though, probably reflecting that I’m a 1990’s emacs user and haven’t done much to modernize my usage since then:
    File mode specification error: (file-missing Cannot open load file No such file or directory hydra)
    Also, if I try using M-x package-install and then Install package: chapel-mode when I try hitting return it says [no match]
    Damon Kwok
    @damon-kwok
    open chapel-mode.el, then: M-x package-install-file (not package-install)
    package-install-file will be installed form locally
    Brad Chamberlain
    @bradcray
    OK (should the comment in the file be updated to reflect this? I see you said this above, but I was looking at the comment when trying it).
    Doing this, I get:
    Need packagehydra-0.15.0’, but only 0.13.4 is available