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    coveralls commented #533
  • Dec 12 08:07
    coveralls commented #533
MirageInc
@MirageInc
Thank you very much.
Right, so I have a FINAL question - honestly final - I promise!
It's regarding the diagram I mentioned
So
If we were to look at your rival library's homepage (i.e. the homepage of ColorPy http://markkness.net/colorpy/ColorPy.html)
We would see, scrolling down
A section on blackbodies
And they show how to make a diagram in which temperature, rather than wavelength, is on the x-axis
And the spectrum above it displays the overall colour for each temperature, calculated (I would guess) through the XYZ colour matching by generating a spectrum for each temperature
Thomas Mansencal
@KelSolaar
Yup!
MirageInc
@MirageInc
My question is just whether Colour Science for Python has any similar diagram system
Where we can make the x-axis temperature, or thickness of a film, or something else
And show NOT a spectrum but instead the overall "sights" of many spectra with respect to this new variable
Thomas Mansencal
@KelSolaar
Not out of the box for your specific case but if you look at the example I linked: https://colab.research.google.com/drive/1NRcdXSCshivkwoU2nieCvC3y14fx1X4X#scrollTo=IffyjISw8Unz
It should get you well on track
Let me know!
It uses the LED generator for the spectral distributions
but overall it should be pretty much the same.
MirageInc
@MirageInc
OK thank you - I'll work from it.
This has all been VERY VERY helpful
Goodbye for now!
Thomas Mansencal
@KelSolaar
o/
Thomas Mansencal
@KelSolaar
If you have some code you want to contribute back btw, this is welcomed :)
MirageInc
@MirageInc
I got the physics-generation aspect to finally work (if I could send you a photo, I would!). If/When I get the rest of the project to work today, I'll be happy to send you some code.
If you'd be interested in including a thin-film interference piece of code just a bit like your blackbody stuff, I'd be happy.
You'd be required to give an angle of incidence for your light, the thickness of your film, the refractive index of your liquid OR say that it's water and instead give a temperature and wavelength (because I can then calculate the respective index directly given a separate empirical algorithm I know of) and then we can generate a similar plot to your blackbody stuff, such as a spectrum and the XYZ overall look.
Equally I could give you the kind of code I'm actually using in my project, where it can generate a spectrum with different thicknesses.
Either way, depending on what you're interested in adding, I can try to work that extra bit harder and give you something workable that is compatible with the rest of your library.
Thomas Mansencal
@KelSolaar
Both seems equally great, no rush anyway but it sounds interesting enough that I thought I would ask!
gustain
@gustain
Dear Thomas,
Dear Thomas, I would like to obtain the values that are used for the D65 illuminants. By reading the docs I found how to plot it, but do I have the possibility to get the actual value, as a array or a dictionary ? Thank you
gustain
@gustain
Sorry to bother I just found it !
Thomas Mansencal
@KelSolaar
Hi! Glad you found them, for other people reading they are available like that:
  • Chromaticity coordinates: colour.ILLUMINANTS['CIE 1931 2 Degree Standard Observer']['D65']
  • Chromaticity coordinates alias: colour.ILLUMINANTS['cie_2_1931']['D65']
  • Spectral distribution: colour.ILLUMINANTS_SDS['D65']
MirageInc
@MirageInc
Hey Thomas
I have finished with what I was working on with my project
and I have written a "sanitised" file containing the functions I thought you might like to add to the library
and it contains an explanation of the things.
How can I send it to you?
Once you see it, you probably won't be that impressed.
Thomas Mansencal
@KelSolaar
If you want to be listed as contributor to the repository, the easiest is probably to fork Colour and drop the file maybe in the colour/phenomena directory or anywhere you think most of the code should be and push back to your fork
I can then work from your commit so that you would be shown in the history! :)
MirageInc
@MirageInc
Just because I'm not the smartest guy and also because I don't really know how to use Git, I'll explain what I did:
I forked Colour
then I added my file to colour/phenomena
then I made a pull-request for this fork...
I assume that works?
And again, I've stripped down all the stuff to just 3 functions that a general user would want to use and I hope they're cool enough to be included..
MirageInc
@MirageInc
Yeah... I expected the pull-request to wait for some kind of approval but I think it was outright blocked...
Thomas Mansencal
@KelSolaar
Thanks I can see the PR here: colour-science/colour#525
Thomas Mansencal
@KelSolaar
I will ask a few questions over there!