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  • May 20 2020 05:04

    ocramz on gh-pages

    Add `sampling` (compare)

  • May 19 2020 09:03

    ocramz on gh-pages

    Add kdt, Supervised Learning se… (compare)

  • Apr 14 2020 01:32
    tonyday567 removed as member
  • Jan 30 2020 07:37

    ocramz on gh-pages

    Add arrayfire (compare)

  • Jan 02 2020 12:51

    ocramz on gh-pages

    add inliterate (compare)

  • Jan 02 2020 12:43

    ocramz on gh-pages

    update hvega entry (compare)

  • Jul 01 2019 09:43
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  • Jun 15 2019 04:55

    ocramz on gh-pages

    Add pcg-random (compare)

  • Jun 14 2019 16:08
    ocramz labeled #42
  • Jun 14 2019 16:08
    ocramz labeled #42
  • Jun 14 2019 16:08
    ocramz labeled #42
  • Jun 14 2019 16:08
    ocramz labeled #42
  • Jun 14 2019 16:08
    ocramz labeled #42
  • Jun 14 2019 16:08
    ocramz labeled #42
  • Jun 14 2019 16:08
    ocramz opened #42
  • Jun 14 2019 16:08
    ocramz opened #42
  • Jun 06 2019 18:21

    ocramz on gh-pages

    Fix graphite link Merge pull request #41 from alx… (compare)

  • Jun 06 2019 18:21
    ocramz closed #41
  • Jun 06 2019 18:21
    ocramz closed #41
  • Jun 06 2019 17:32
    alx741 opened #41
Alexey Kuleshevich
@lehins
:smile:
Alexey Kuleshevich
@lehins
Later on I will give chart-svg a shot for plotting image histograms in HIP. I don't want to use Chart library for this because it depends on lens, which brings the whole kmettoverse with it. So I am really stoked to get a lightweight solution for plots in pure Haskell.
Tony Day
@tonyday567
lens is a dependency, but I use it heavily in connection with OverloadedLabels, so there is zero lens usage requirement. If I ever had the inclination, I could store a Chart it in a dhall file.
In chart-svg, histograms are equally-spaced rectangles (RectA's). There's support in numhask-space for a histogram primitive, but Chart.Bar probably has everything you need for a nice-looking, lightweight chart.
Alexey Kuleshevich
@lehins

lens is a dependency

Dammit, didn't look at that. In that case I'll have to weigh if it is worth to switch from Charts. I prefer to keep my packages very light on dependencies and lens with all its baggage is not acceptable for me. I might release a separate package that just does the image histogram plotting (that my original plan for Charts at least).

Tony Day
@tonyday567
Yeah, it's easy. Just shapes!
Marco Z
@ocramz
what's up gang
Stefan Dresselhaus
@Drezil
waiting for haskell.love ;)
Marco Z
@ocramz
is it today?
Alexey Kuleshevich
@lehins
nah, over the next weekend
Austin Huang
@austinvhuang
@NickSeagull Do you see tintin being developed further in the future?
Nick Tchayka
@NickSeagull
@austinvhuang We're not actively developing this project. We're using it in a few other projects, like the AWS lambda runtime, so we'll be occasionally updating it if we find a non met requirement there, but we'd be glad to review and merge community contributions.
Randall Britten
@vertexcite
Bumped into this at ICFP today: https://dl.acm.org/doi/10.1145/3406088.3409019
See also https://github.com/bolt12/laop (I think).
Callan McGill
@Boarders
Does anyone familiar with massiv know how parallelization works with a function like this: https://hackage.haskell.org/package/massiv-0.5.4.0/docs/Data-Massiv-Array.html#v:mapIO_
Alexey Kuleshevich
@lehins
@Boarders it will work in exactly same way as when the delayed array is being loaded: split the array in as many chunks as there are cores and map an IO action over each of them in a row major fashion in parallel. I talk a bit about in here: https://youtu.be/AAx2a0bUsxA?t=2215
Marco Z
@ocramz
:wave:
Marco Z
@ocramz
This channel has been silent for a while, how have you all been?
Michael Chavinda
@mchav
Great. Was also wondering why traffic has calmed down.
Adam Conner-Sax
@adamConnerSax
@ocramz Good! How are you?
Jonathan Reeve
@JonathanReeve
Hi @all. I've added a few new functions to PlotlyHS, to suit my visualization needs for a project I'm working on. I'd like to contribute these back somehow. At the same time, I don't know if I should be the sole maintainer of this package, seeing as there still a lot that, as a Haskell beginner, I don't really understand about it. What would you all think about putting this in the DataHaskell organization on GItHub, somehow? I'm talking with the original author of the package diffusionkinetics/open#124 about it.
(Oh and my fork is here, by the way.)
Marco Z
@ocramz
hi @JonathanReeve , thank you for reaching out! DH has been quite frozen for a while, we've all been busy with other stuff
what kind of help would you need to push PlotlyHs forward?
Jonathan Reeve
@JonathanReeve
Good question. I guess first it'd be nice to host it at DataHaskell. I'd still work on it there, but it'd get more eyes on it in that org, I feel like. Then at some point I could use a hand in adding some examples, and integrating those examples with the existing ones at DataHaskell.
Riley Moher
@avatR630
Hello everyone. I'm currently learning Haskell while working on my research centered on semantic data types. My background is more in first order logic, ontologies, and data science, but what I'm learning about Haskell seems very interesting to me so far! Just checking out what tools currently exist for data science with haskell
Austin Huang
@austinvhuang
Thanks for taking over ploylyhs @JonathanReeve
there were some other promising modules in diffusionkinetics, i'm kind of bummed it's stalled but i understand
Austin Huang
@austinvhuang

@ocramz how is the dataframe library going?

i was wondering - i'm not an expert in this space but i always figured dataframe libraries would be implemented as struct-of-arrays rather than array-of-structs to be cache & vectorization friendly.

Marco Z
@ocramz
hey @austinvhuang , yes that's how Arrow and similar work. Heidi was more of an experiment on API ergonomics than performance
Austin Huang
@austinvhuang
makes sense @ocramz. are you (or anyone else) looking into arrow-based dataframe implementations? that seems like it'd be a useful direction but the repos i've seen don't look active.
Marco Z
@ocramz
@austinvhuang Arrows inactive? looks quite the contrary .. https://ursalabs.org/blog/ursa-computing/
Austin Huang
@austinvhuang
Arrow is doing great. Haskell integration with arrow is what's missing.
Casey Kneale
@caseykneale
Hi everyone. So I am like 20 minutes into learning Haskell. Why isn't it used for data stuff already? It looks so promising it's crazy.
Austin Huang
@austinvhuang
The biggest challenge is the ecosystem needs to be implemented, differentiated, and matured. Python as a language isn't inherently suited for data science, but the fact that pandas, sklearn, pyspark, pytorch, tensorflow, seaborn, plotly, etc. exist and have had rough edges smoothed out by years of use cases makes it the defacto standard.
Marco Z
@ocramz
and also because most haskellers are a bunch of perfectionists, so they can never agree on the Right Abstraction ;)
BTW welcome @caseykneale ! Don't hesitate to ask here if you have any questions
Marco Z
@ocramz
Happy new year all!
Adam Conner-Sax
@adamConnerSax
Happy New Year!
Anurag Hooda
@specdrake
Hello, I am really excited about using Haskell for data analysis.
Came to know about DataHaskell through reddit.

The biggest challenge is the ecosystem needs to be implemented, differentiated, and matured. Python as a language isn't inherently suited for data science, but the fact that pandas, sklearn, pyspark, pytorch, tensorflow, seaborn, plotly, etc. exist and have had rough edges smoothed out by years of use cases makes it the defacto standard.

yeah exactly

Marco Z
@ocramz
Welcome @specdrake 🙌
Marco Z
@ocramz
@specdrake what kind of problems do you work on usually? or, what made you interested in DataHaskell?
Justin Le
@mstksg
b/ 1
Tony Day
@tonyday567
I'm pretty happy with chart-svg. It's a solid design, easy api and the svg's are tight.
Yves Parès
@YPares
Hi ppl! Is anyone knowledgable with existing SQL libs for Haskell? I'd like to do the following:
  • Support both sqlite and postgres backends
  • CREATE tables from a HashMap Text TypeRep, supposing each TypeRep can correspond to a Sql numeric/string type (not looking for an ORM)
    I can do that with some boilerplate with HDBC or {postgres,sqlite}-simple, but I wanted to know if there was somewhere a lib that could limit the amount of SQL code to write manually.
    Selda ( https://hackage.haskell.org/package/selda ) looks promising but it generates tables out of plain old records through Generic. Pretty cool, but I don't have such static datatypes (my schemas will be generated semi-dynamically at runtime, albeit in a deterministic fashion, hence the hashmaps).
    opaleye looked interesting too, but opaleye-sqlite seems not maintained anymore.
The rest of the queries to perform are fairly mundane insert/select-based stuff, on classical sql number/string types, nothing fancy
Yves Parès
@YPares
To give a bit more detail, my use of SQL would be to index some datasets that we produce and store on S3. Each dataset will be produced in some context, and that context comes with metadata bits (numbers, text values etc) that we want to use later to query through all the datasets that we produced that match some metadata filters. But these metadata bits aren't known at compile-time (they're similar to the way Katip context Items work, for those who know katip), although they are known in advance (ie. before running the program's logic per se) and they don't change from one run to the next unless we edit the code.