These are chat archives for ethereum/tutorials

7th
Sep 2017
James Ray
@jamesray1
Sep 07 2017 02:07
I want to emphasise the importance of having good, clear documentation for Ethereum so that people who are looking to help with development, like myself, can get up to speed more quickly. The yellow paper could be more readable as described here in this issue: ethereum/yellowpaper#329. The LLL tutorials listed here are not on a readthedocs website, unlike ethdocs or Solidity. Going through the LLL tutorials, I have made a lot of comments, with the general finding that they need updates, and I have been unable to proceed further through them due to a couple of issues:
ethereumjs/testrpc#382
ethereumjs/testrpc#380
I've made an issue here: ethereum/wiki#468
jjpsuarez1113
@jjpsuarez1113
Sep 07 2017 05:21
How can I do the mapping in the pricing of this Crowdsale such that 1 CrowdsaleToken = 0.002 ETH?
jjpsuarez1113
@jjpsuarez1113
Sep 07 2017 06:59
Another question, @MidnightLightning, I reached the Funding Goal of my Crowdsale contract but the Ether isn't sent to the beneficiary automatically. How can I fix this?
Brooks Boyd
@MidnightLightning
Sep 07 2017 07:03
A contract cannot do anything on its own; it needs a transaction to trigger it. So, as is, it's a separate transaction call to evaluate and execute. If you want a payout to happen right away when a payment is made that crosses the goal amount, you can add a check in that function, but then you're penalizing the person who donates last, since they need to pay for the gas to cover all the payout logic.
jjpsuarez1113
@jjpsuarez1113
Sep 07 2017 07:12
Well, I made a transaction using the checkGoalReached function of the Crowdsale code and still, nothing happened.
jjpsuarez1113
@jjpsuarez1113
Sep 07 2017 07:29
@MidnightLightning I executed the checkGoalReached and then the safeWithdrawal using the beneficiaries' account. I can't withdraw the funds from the Crowdsale
Brooks Boyd
@MidnightLightning
Sep 07 2017 11:01
Hmmm, is this a contract on the main network or one of the public testnets? Can you post the address here so we can see the transaction details?
jjpsuarez1113
@jjpsuarez1113
Sep 07 2017 12:25
Hello. @MidnightLightning I got it to work. I have this one question though. I have to put the Shareholder's Association as the beneficiary for the Crowdsale as said in the tutorial. The problem is, using Ethereum Wallet GUI, I can't use safeWithdrawal since the Shareholder's Association is a contract. How will I be able to execute the safeWithdrawal function as the Shareholder's Association using Ethereum Wallet?
jjpsuarez1113
@jjpsuarez1113
Sep 07 2017 13:17
Is there any way?
Brooks Boyd
@MidnightLightning
Sep 07 2017 13:40
The trick there, @jjpsuarez1113 is that the Shareholder Association contract is based on the idea of Proposals and Votes. The action that is "proposed" as part of a Proposal is a transaction's data payload. Effectively you're suggesting that the Shareholder Association (as an entity) do something. In your case, what you want the Shareholder Association to do is claim the benefit by calling safeWithdrawal on the Crowdsale contract. So, you'd figure out the transaction data needed to call safeWithdrawal (use the guide in the DAO tutorial; create the transaction yourself as if you were going to do it as yourself, but instead of signing and transmitting it, just copy the transaction bytecode). Then on the Shareholder Association contract, create a transaction calling newProposal, setting the beneficiary to the Crowdsale contract, weAmount to zero, JobDescription of "Claim crowdsale funds", and transactionBytecode of what you just generated.
Once the proposal is created, all members of the Shareholder Association can vote() for it, and if it's successful, someone can call executeProposal, which will actually execute the transaction (note the line in that function that has p.recipient.call.value(p.amount)(transactionBytecode); that's where the Shareholder Association does the transaction, in its own name, so it looks to the Crowdsale contract that the correct address is sending the transaction).
che.joharia
@CheJharia
Sep 07 2017 13:44
hi, want to learn solidity
do i need to run eth full node on my macbook pro?
i was on https://www.ethereum.org/greeter, and it says to run geth on command line, but this seems to download the whole eth blockchain
jjpsuarez1113
@jjpsuarez1113
Sep 07 2017 13:56
Thank you so much @MidnightLightning for all the help!!
mathscience
@mathscience
Sep 07 2017 14:16
Hi I wanted to ask if it is free to build an app on ethereum?
phalexo
@phalexo
Sep 07 2017 16:20
@jjpsuarez1113 Why would you provide false information when you don't know?
jjpsuarez1113
@jjpsuarez1113
Sep 07 2017 16:27
Isn't it free?
jjpsuarez1113
@jjpsuarez1113
Sep 07 2017 16:35
Isn't coding in Solidity free? I thought it was the same thing. If it isn't, my apologies.
Chim Kan
@designium
Sep 07 2017 16:36
@mathscience the language is free of course, but deploying the app to ETH blockchain will cost you ether and
@mathscience every single time you need to do a transaction with your smart contract, it will require more ether.
@mathscience therefore it is not free, it's actually expensive compared to the normal way of doing an app per transaction cost
che.joharia
@CheJharia
Sep 07 2017 16:37
@designium anyone is tracking how much ether a dApp consumes on a daily basis?
Chim Kan
@designium
Sep 07 2017 16:38
@CheJharia I don't know. It depends on many variables such as average price of gas price accepted by the miners, your code complexity, etc.
che.joharia
@CheJharia
Sep 07 2017 16:40
@designium i see. so if i have a business model that wants to use ethereum, my cost would include gas being used to run my app? to be profitable, my profit must be more than the cost of gas to run my app?
Chim Kan
@designium
Sep 07 2017 16:43
@CheJharia of course, the current way to make money now is creating Tokens; other dapps out there might not be economically profitable; but still provide fun.
if you have any other suggestions about good tutorials to follow please let me know
che.joharia
@CheJharia
Sep 07 2017 16:44
@designium thanks! will let you know, still got lots to learn (economic, technology) but it's all exciting!
phalexo
@phalexo
Sep 07 2017 16:48
@designium If you consider token creation as a way to make money without producing anything of value otherwise, you might be engaging in what normally should be called securities fraud.
Chim Kan
@designium
Sep 07 2017 17:03
@phalexo I agree with you. But I think the token value creation is more on the point of using tokens and buying something of value, for instance, in-app games, virtual goods or even real services. The security fraud discussion should be open though, it's something that is happening and influencing the market in a big way.
Brooks Boyd
@MidnightLightning
Sep 07 2017 19:18
If you as the contract-creator are the primary one creating transactions to trigger functions on your contract, then yes, you are going to be the one paying a lot of gas costs, and your overall profit needs to factor that expense in. However, if your contract is designed to be used by your users directly (DApp or otherwise), then they're the one paying the gas costs; you then don't have that expense, but then all your users need Ethereum accounts and their own ether to pay for gas costs.
John Mott
@johnmott59
Sep 07 2017 22:50
Hey, I'm a developer and have been asked to research ICO appropriate contracts. If I follow the tutorials would that get me there? Are there consultants out there who have experience who could help?