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  • Oct 14 09:37
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Mason DeMelo
@MasonDeMelo
Hi all!
I'm interested in contributing to coconut and I'm trying to get a development environment set up, but unfortunately I'm running into some trouble with running "make dev". It looks like it's failing when trying to install cPyparsing, is this something that people have run into before?
Evan Hubinger
@evhub
@MasonDeMelo What's the error that you're getting?
Mason DeMelo
@MasonDeMelo
This is the log:
https://pastebin.com/96hVdJDY
I'm trying to install it in a Python 3.8 Virtualenv on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS
Evan Hubinger
@evhub
@MasonDeMelo It looks like your error is being caused by the C compilation failing. This is often caused by a mismatch in the Python version you're running and the Python libraries used by your C compiler by default. Things you can do: try installing outside of a virtualenv, explicitly set your PATH and/or other environment variables (like LIBRARY_PATH) to point to the right version of the Python libraries, or just don't use cPyparsing and use python pyparsing instead—Coconut functions fine with either.
ShalokShalom
@ShalokShalom
Coco can compile to Python 3 code, yes?
Or only to bytecode?
Evan Hubinger
@evhub
@ShalokShalom Coconut always compiles to Python source code not bytecode. By default, Coconut will compile to universal code which will run the same on any Python version. To specifically target Python 3, just pass --target 3.
ShalokShalom
@ShalokShalom
Fine ^^
What is the most readable?
Evan Hubinger
@evhub
You'll probably get the most readable code with --target sys, but compiled Coconut isn't really meant to be readable. You can also try passing --keep-lines to put the Coconut source as comments on the compiled Python, which might help readability in terms of helping you understand what Coconut line generated that Python line.
ShalokShalom
@ShalokShalom
Thanks a lot
Brian Parma
@bj0
i see #174 is still open, is there a workaround for prompting for input?
Evan Hubinger
@evhub
@bj0 #174 is closed—did you link the wrong issue accidentally?
Brian Parma
@bj0
oh sorry, I was in the wrong gitter channel ><
Thurston Sexton
@tbsexton
@evhub do you have any experience with google JAX?
I actually got into "functional" style after its requirement in things like jax, autograd, etc.
and ended up loving it, obviously finding the existing python tooling lacking...how I found toolz, pampy (https://github.com/santinic/pampy), and then of course coconut
the reason I ask is, i think jax could really seriously benefit from the syntax/features of coconut
BUT, while the basic syntax is all fine (just python, after all), it seems the jax jit-compile is incompatible with coconut, somehow.
I would love to have them work together (Ive had a working/testing notebook called cuckoo for cocojax for a long time now haha). But I'm not sure if this incompatibility is happening at the coconut level or something to do with the depths of jax.
Evan Hubinger
@evhub
@tbsexton I've only ever used tensorflow and pytorch, but I've heard good things about JAX. If you could raise an issue with the error you're getting when you try to run JAX on compiled Coconut, I'd be happy to take a look.
Thurston Sexton
@tbsexton
actually, i pulled fresh versions of both to make sure and.....it seems to be working just fine now ಠ_ಠ
And it's glorious, the workflow is fantastic with jax's vmap and coconut's partials/piping. I'm going to be running through a bunch of old/new code to refactor to coconut just to find edge-cases.
This may be worth mentioning on the website or docs or something....jax and autograd both repeatedly call out the need for functional coding style, so this is a huge QoL upgrade for those workflows. See https://jax.readthedocs.io/en/latest/notebooks/Common_Gotchas_in_JAX.html#%F0%9F%94%AA-Pure-functions
Evan Hubinger
@evhub
great—glad to hear it!
ShalokShalom
@ShalokShalom
@evhub Please, I do like to see the integration of the pipe operator in Coconut? Do you do that with map? Can I see it?
Evan Hubinger
@evhub
@ShalokShalom I don't understand your question. Are you asking for Coconut's internal implementation of the pipe operator? The bulk of that can be found here, if that's what you're looking for.
Honestly, though, if you just want to understand how pipe works, it'd probably be easier to just use coconut --display to look at what various different uses of the pipe operator compile to.
ShalokShalom
@ShalokShalom
No, this is exactly what I was looking for
Why is this so imperative? Wouldnt it be far more easy, to use map?
I consider to implement a pipe in another language, that is very similar to Python, and try to look for inspiration. Is that for performance reasons so imperative?
Evan Hubinger
@evhub
@ShalokShalom How else would you compile x |> f other than to f(x)? There's nothing map-like going on with pipe, it's just function calls. And function calls are obviously very functional.
Genesis
@TheExGenesis

Hey Evan, thanks for your amazing work!

I was wondering what the right way to configure vscode to use coconut inside the interactive python REPL thing/ embedded notebooks. Already installed coconut --jupyter

Evan Hubinger
@evhub
@TheExGenesis Thanks! I don't use VSCode very much myself so I have no idea, but you're welcome to raise an issue for it. Certainly if VSCode has Jupyter support you can try to configure it to use the coconut kernel, but I don't know enough about VSCode to know how to do that.
Russ Abbott
@RussAbbott
Hi, I'm trying to install Coconut on Google colab. It seems to install, but it doesn't run. Please see my StackOverflow question. https://stackoverflow.com/questions/63965737/is-it-possible-to-run-coconut-on-colab. Thanks.
Russ Abbott
@RussAbbott
When I tried the iterator version of quick_sort in the online interpreter, I got a syntax error on the yield from line.
Evan Hubinger
@evhub
@RussAbbott It looks to me like you successfully installed Coconut, but didn't actually switch to the Coconut kernel rather than the Python kernel.
Russ Abbott
@RussAbbott
So, how do you tell colab to switch to the Coconut kernel?
vinodh
@rawvnode

hello, i'm a super noob to functional programming and the Coconut language. I went over the tutorial section to get a grasp of few of the concepts and was hoping to apply some of the learnings to a messy piece of code but i'm struggling to get started.

my current solution is to create layers of nesting to get some values out of a json object. i'm looking for some advise on how to take a functional approach to solve this problem.

here is my test json

{
    "mobile/stats": {
        "nestedStats": {
            "kind": "stats",
            "entries": {
                "activeMemberCnt": {
                    "value": "3"
                },
                "totRequests": {
                    "value": 600
                },
                "mobile/members/stats": {
                    "nestedStats": {
                        "entries": {
                            "firePunch/stats": {
                                "nestedStats": {
                                    "entries": {
                                        "power": {
                                            "value": 25
                                        },
                                        "pp": {
                                            "value": 10
                                        },
                                        "type" : {
                                            "value" : "Fire"
                                        }
                                    }
                                }
                            },
                            "icePunch/stats": {
                                "nestedStats": {
                                    "entries": {
                                        "power": {
                                            "value": 75
                                        },
                                        "pp": {
                                            "value": 15
                                        },
                                        "type" : {
                                            "value" : "Ice"
                                        }
                                    }
                                }
                            },
                            "karateChop/stats": {
                                "nestedStats": {
                                    "entries": {
                                        "power": {
                                            "value": 25
                                        },
                                        "pp": {
                                            "value": 10
                                        },
                                        "type" : {
                                            "value" : "Fighting"
                                        }
                                    }
                                }
                            }
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
and my messy piece of current code
stats = {}
for k, v in test_json.items():
    for kk, vv in v.items():
        if 'nestedStats' in kk:
            for kkk, vvv in vv.items():
                if 'entries' in kkk:
                    for kkk1, vvv1 in vvv.items():
                        if '/stats' in kkk1:
                            for kkkk, vvvv in vvv1.items():
                                for kkkkk, vvvvv in vvvv.items():
                                    for kkkkkk, vvvvvv in vvvvv.items():
                                        for kkkkkkk, vvvvvvv in vvvvvv.items():
                                            for kkkkkkkk, vvvvvvvv in vvvvvvv.items():
                                                stats[kkkkkk] = vvvvvvvv


poke_stats = json.dumps(stats).replace('\'', '"').replace('description', '').replace('{"":', '').replace('{"value":', '').replace('},', ',')[:-1]
Evan Hubinger
@evhub
@rawvnode You could use map and filter instead of for loops, but I don't actually know whether that'll help that much here.
ShalokShalom
@ShalokShalom
@evhub Oh, somebody told me, that pipes are implemented with map or reduce, so I thought..
matrixbot
@matrixbot

nalix > <@gitter_rawvnode:matrix.org> hello, i'm a super noob to functional programming and the Coconut language. I went over the tutorial section to get a grasp of few of the concepts and was hoping to apply some of the learnings to a messy piece of code but i'm struggling to get started.

my current solution is to create layers of nesting to get some values out of a json object. i'm looking for some advise on how to take a functional approach to solve this problem.
test json
```

The function approach to deeply nested data structures is lenses (at least the only one I know of). This seems like what you'd need, though I haven't used the package myself.

nalix * The functional approach to deeply nested data structures is lenses (at least the only one I know of). This seems like what you'd need, though I haven't used the package myself.
vinodh
@rawvnode
@evhub @matrixbot nalix thanks for the pointers
vinodh
@rawvnode

i think i've somewhat simplified the code to be slightly less convoluted by adding a few things...

also i made a few assumptions to reduce the complexity within the flow like separating the logic to handle parent stats and its member stats.

the new function walks along the json tree path going from parent, child all the way down until it encounters an attribute labeled "value" and add its value to the member_stats dict when there is a match and the value is of type int. The key will be the second but previous element in the path list.

I've replaced the deep nesting of for loops with a recursive function. I'm hoping to add more features like pattern matching and map/filter if possible and also eliminate the global level dicts to manage state :)

parent_stats = {}
member_stats = {}

def traverse(obj, path=None):
    if path is None:
        path = []

    if isinstance(obj, dict):
        value = { k: traverse(v, path + [k]) for k, v in obj.items()}
    elif isinstance(obj, int):
        value = obj
        if "value" in path:
            node_key = list(filter(lambda x: re.search('https.*members.*members/(.+)/stats\Z', x), path))
            if node_key:
                if node_key[0] not in member_stats.keys():
                    member_stats[node_key[0]] = {path[-2] : value}
                else:
                    member_stats[node_key[0]].update({path[-2] : value})
            else:
                parent_stats[path[-2]] = value
    else:
        value = obj
    return value

traverse(poke_stats)
vinodh
@rawvnode
@matrixbot nalix i will look into the lens project but i am hoping to achieve some benefits of using coconut now that this version is somewhat readable than the earlier version :) any thoughts?
vinodh
@rawvnode
sorry one more text to show the desired flattened output -
parent_stats

{
    "mobile/stats": {
        "activeMemberCnt" : 3,
        "totRequests" : 600
    }
}

member_stats

{
    "firePunch/stats" : {
        "power" : 25,
        "pp" : 10
    },
    "icePunch/stats" : {
        "power" : 25,
        "pp" : 15
    },
    "karateChop/stats" : {
        "power" : 25,
        "pp" : 10
    }
}
ShalokShalom
@ShalokShalom
@evhub Pattern matching comes in Python 3.10
Coconut does a) ignore this or b) ditches its own pattern matching?
Or some c)