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    bakpakin on master

    Hang forever instead of exit ea… Update CHANGELOG.md (compare)

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    bakpakin on master

    Why is the copyright gone... (compare)

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  • Oct 19 14:03

    bakpakin on master

    Fix checked for fiber being dea… (compare)

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saikyun
@saikyun
Hm, okay, so maybe it's not worth trying to create them myself?
Eric Shimizu Karbstein
@GrayJack
If you want to expose some external type to Janet, Abstract type is the way to go
saikyun
@saikyun
Okay, but how? :)
Are there any code examples of people having done this?
yumaikas-
@yumaikas:matrix.org
[m]
I mean, there's the Janet standard library, no?
Eric Shimizu Karbstein
@GrayJack
I think the simplest example is the Janet core library for the 64bit integers
bakpakin
@bakpakin:matrix.org
[m]
Yes, many languages that bind to C have an analogue to abstract types. For example, in Lua they are called userdata.
Jaylib also has many such types
sogaiu
@sogaiu:matrix.org
[m]
@Saikyun: this might be another example: https://github.com/sogaiu/janet-pcg-random
andrewchambers
@andrewchambers
@Saikyun I have done a lot of libraries that use abstract types
jaylib will use them too
oh, as bakpakin said
saikyun
@saikyun
Thanks for all examples :) will save them
andrewchambers
@andrewchambers
all an abstract type really is
is a slot of memory managed by the janet garbage collector, and a type
the type is associated with a set of callbacks
so your C code can do whatever it wants with that memory
saikyun
@saikyun
That sounds reasonable :) I just didn't have an easy way to relate to it. With the examples I understand a bit better
Thanks for explaining
Zach Smith (subsetpark)
@subsetpark:matrix.org
[m]
Has anybody got an example of how to use maclintf?
I'm particularly not really sure what the levels should be
oh, maybe it's :relaxed etc...
sogaiu
@sogaiu:matrix.org
[m]

that interpretation seems consistent with the content of this: https://github.com/janet-lang/janet/issues/644#issuecomment-851054482

Each lint message has the following structure:

(level line column message)

Where level is a keyword lint level, line and column are the line and column of the source code where the lint issue occurred, and message is a user facing message.

and this line: https://github.com/janet-lang/janet/blob/master/src/boot/boot.janet#L1798 inside the definition of maclintf has:

(array/push lints [level l c msg])
bakpakin
@bakpakin:matrix.org
[m]
If you are wondering how the levels are defined, it is entirely by the lint-levels binding in boot.janet
(def- lint-levels
  {:none 0
   :relaxed 1
   :normal 2
   :strict 3
   :all math/inf})
This is technically not supported but if you were to add more mappings to this table, you could have more lint levels. Each level is a keyword that maps to a priority.
The way to think about it is, more important lint messages will have a lower priority number.
The user set lint thresholds are maximums
bakpakin
@bakpakin:matrix.org
[m]
for example, if -w normal is passed an argument to janet, any lint message of level 2 or below will print a warning message
if -x relaxed is passed, any lint message of level 1 or below will cause a compiler error
Yes, I need to update the Janet documentation on this, although I hope to do that this weekend.
bakpakin
@bakpakin:matrix.org
[m]
:point_up: Edit: This is technically not supported but if you were to add more mappings to this struct, you could have more lint levels. Each level is a keyword that maps to a priority.
Zach Smith (subsetpark)
@subsetpark:matrix.org
[m]

Currently compiling a native lib and getting this:

rl.c:1:10: fatal error: janet.h: No such file or directory

What's the likelihood the janet package for this os (void linux) is misconfigured?

bakpakin
@bakpakin:matrix.org
[m]
try jpm --verbose build
Zach Smith (subsetpark)
@subsetpark:matrix.org
[m]
ah! It's one of those with a separate -devel package
bakpakin
@bakpakin:matrix.org
[m]
ok good to hear
Zach Smith (subsetpark)
@subsetpark:matrix.org
[m]
("it" being Void in general)
Zach Smith (subsetpark)
@subsetpark:matrix.org
[m]
Zach Smith (subsetpark)
@subsetpark:matrix.org
[m]
  • and then would none be for what I ws describing before as info?
(ie, a message emitted by the compiler by one that should not halt compilation at any strictness level)
bakpakin
@bakpakin:matrix.org
[m]
More or less, but a :relaxed message is actually the noisiest. :relaxed here means it will show up if the threshold is set to :relaxed.
Zach Smith (subsetpark)
@subsetpark:matrix.org
[m]
Hm - is there a difference between showing up and failing the compile/returning a non-zero error code?
bakpakin
@bakpakin:matrix.org
[m]
The default warn threshold is normal
and the default error threshold is none
Zach Smith (subsetpark)
@subsetpark:matrix.org
[m]
In other words, is it possible using this system to always show this message, but change whether it's a failure or just informational?
bakpakin
@bakpakin:matrix.org
[m]
You shouldn't always show a lint message
but more or less, yes
I may add some more aliases that would make intent like this more clear
but they would just map to integer levels
basically - use :strict for inconsequential things that a user shouldn't see normally