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    Ace Pace
    @acepace
    yeah, I looked at that and played around.
    Ace Pace
    @acepace
    @TysonAndre the signature file was actually great for me, I can generate a full structure graph of a project in a few lines from that
    next question is if you have an idea how do I dump the callgraph?
    Ace Pace
    @acepace
    image.png
    just to show what i'm pushing towards
    Tyson Andre
    @TysonAndre
    You'd have to write a plugin for it (AnalyzeFunctionCallCapability would help). tool/pdep is somewhat related, but not what you wanted - it dumps a graph of the dependencies of classes on other classes. Dumping method/property relationships might be within the scope of what pdep could eventually do, but I'm not the owner of pdep
    Tyson Andre
    @TysonAndre
    A more efficient approach would be enable the reference tracking setting or dead code detection and to use the references to classes to build the graph. That would get you everything except internal elements such as strlen, etc
        /**
         * @override
         */
        public function addReference(FileRef $file_ref): void
        {
            if (Config::get_track_references()) {
                // Currently, we don't need to track references to PHP-internal methods/functions/constants
                // such as PHP_VERSION, strlen(), Closure::bind(), etc.
                // This may change in the future.
                if ($this->isPHPInternal()) {
                    return;
                }
                if ($file_ref instanceof Context && $file_ref->isInFunctionLikeScope() && $file_ref->getFunctionLikeFQSEN() === $this->fqsen) {
                    // Don't track functions calling themselves
                    return;
                }
                $this->reference_list[$file_ref->__toString()] = $file_ref;
            }
        }
    Tyson Andre
    @TysonAndre

    I asked about pdep, but I doubt it's going to get implemented any time soon.

    Also, it wouldn't track calls to functions from themselves, etc., because this is focused on dead code detection

    Ace Pace
    @acepace
    awesome ty
    Ace Pace
    @acepace
    @TysonAndre so I've been busy and got a lot of my plugin working

    I noticed phan doesn't know how to parse callbacks of the form
    call_user_func(array('B', 'parent::who'));
    Where B is a class extending class A both defining Who.

    any idea how I can hack this in?

    or less hack, more properly :)
    Tyson Andre
    @TysonAndre
    @acepace phan/phan#1854 - See ArrayShapeType::asFunctionInterfaceOrNull, possibly ContextNode->getFunctionLikeFromDynamicExpression, and possibly CallableParamPlugin
    There's hundreds of open issues and it was low priority relative to them to support that syntax. I'm open to PRs with tests
    Ace Pace
    @acepace
    thanks!
    Patrick Allaert
    @patrickallaert

    Hello,

    With the method below:

    private function getDocumentRoot(): string
    {
        return realpath(__DIR__ . "/web/");
    }

    Phan returns the following error:

    PhanPossiblyFalseTypeReturn Returning realpath((__DIR__ . '/web/')) of type false|string but getDocumentRoot() is declared to return string (false is incompatible)

    It is an entirely valid error: realpath() can return string or false, while getDocumentRoot() is declared to return a string exclusively.

    My question is: how to address this issue in the state of the art?

    The options I thought about are the following:

    1) Specific Exception:

    private function getDocumentRoot(): string
    {
        $result = realpath(__DIR__ . "/web/");
    
        if (!is_string($result)) {
            throw new \RuntimeException("Cannot compute document root");
        }
    
        return $result;
    }

    While this makes the Phan error dissappear, it just changes the way to catch the exception from \TypeError to \RuntimeException. Somehow it feels non natural to remap the \TypeError to something else, this leads to the next option:

    2) Throwing \TypeError manually:

    private function getDocumentRoot(): string
    {
        $result = realpath(__DIR__ . "/web/");
    
        if (!is_string($result)) {
            throw new \TypeError("Cannot compute document root");
        }
    
        return $result;
    }

    As option 1), it "solves" the reported issue, however it re-implements the natural behaviour of PHP itself: it really feels like boilerplate code.

    3) Acknowledging that a TypeError can occur:

    /**
     * @throws \TypeError
     */
    private function getDocumentRoot(): string
    {
        return realpath(__DIR__ . "/web/");
    }

    While potentially no additional code involved, it could "mark" that a \TypeError is possible and should not be reported as something not handled. However, using @throws does not make the issue dissappear.

    4) Suppressing the issue locally:

    /**
     * @suppress PhanPossiblyFalseTypeReturn
     */
    private function getDocumentRoot(): string
    {
        return realpath(__DIR__ . "/web/");
    }

    This is supressing the issue, however, I feel that @suppress is more like a workaround to tackle edge cases while this seems pretty common. It also feels more like silencing it over declaring an intention.

    I'd like to know how you usually deal with that situation and what the best practices are.

    Tyson Andre
    @TysonAndre

    While potentially no additional code involved, it could "mark" that a \TypeError is possible and should not be reported as something not handled. However, using @throws does not make the issue dissappear.

    I don't plan to implement any support for making @throws hide phan errors/notices - In general, in code being analyzed, it's also possible to throw a TypeError explicitly. It's also unclear what @throws Error and @throws Throwable would/should do since they're parent types.

    Again, depending on the specifics of the situation, I've implemented 1/2/4 in the past to work around notices. To add, I'd personally change 4. to add a description such as @suppress PhanPossiblyFalseTypeReturn in abnormal situtations where PHP can't find the directory or the directory was removed, this will throw a TypeError, and there's no great way to handle this (or bad entries in the realpath cache, or nfs wierdness)

    You could also add a helper function/method called realpathOrThrow to a file/class with type-safe utilities - that's what Phan does for StringUtil::jsonEncode()
    Patrick Allaert
    @patrickallaert

    To add, I'd personally change 4. to add a description such as @suppress PhanPossiblyFalseTypeReturn in abnormal situtations where PHP can't find the directory or the directory was removed, this will throw a TypeError, and there's no great way to handle this (or bad entries in the realpath cache, or nfs wierdness)

    I also opted for 4), the extra comment is indeed probably worth it!

    Thank you @TysonAndre for your opinion. I also opted for option 4) as being the most practical, the extra comment can indeed make it more clear!
    I wanted to be sure I wasn't missing another option.
    Patrick Allaert
    @patrickallaert

    Hi!

    FYI, I filled an issue on PHPStorm's tracker: https://youtrack.jetbrains.com/issue/WI-54573
    It is about the lack of understanding:

    /**
     * @return iterable<Foo>
     */

    The IDE doesn't understand that syntax: looping over the results, it doesn't understand that the inner variable's type is Foo, same with: Generics<Foo>.

    Does anyone have a workaround in the mean time? For now it means commenting with /** @var Foo $item */ every loops, but that is duplication and I hate those markers :-(

    Tyson Andre
    @TysonAndre
    1. PHPStorm supports Generator|Foo[] syntax, which phan doesn't because it uses Generator<Foo> - so you can use @return Generator|Foo[] and @phan-return Generator<Foo>, but that's another type of repetition
    2. You could suppress PHPStorm's warnings, but that doesn't work well on projects/files that don't have other static analyzers set up and phpstorm may have its own checks you'd wish to keep using. I forget how that's done
    3. I'm not sure what PHPStorm's plans are for templates in general, and haven't seen anything in their announcements. I don't work on it and primarily use Vim.
    Patrick Allaert
    @patrickallaert
    Thank you for your answer @TysonAndre ! I dislike Generator|Foo[] because that syntax implies that a native array of Foo could possibly be returned. At least I see all alternatives and didn't think about combining @return and @phan-return at the same time! Thanks again!
    Adrian
    @adrian-enspired
    how would i annotate an array of arrays of a type? is there something like array[type[]] or do i just stick with array[] and document elsewhere?
    Adrian
    @adrian-enspired

    also saw an error i don't understand:

    PhanTypeInvalidRightOperandOfBitwiseOp Invalid operator: right operand of & is bool (expected int|string)

    the line in question is like $x & $key, where $key is an array key (so int|string) and is also asserted to be an int. any idea why phan thinks it's bool?

    Phan 3.2.0
    php-ast version 1.0.6
    PHP version used to run Phan: 7.4.3
    Tyson Andre
    @TysonAndre
    There's many ways to write arrays in union types. See https://github.com/phan/phan/wiki/About-Union-Types. type[][] if all keys are unknown, there's also more elaborate types such as list<array<string, type>>
    I can't tell you why without a self-contained snippet. Maybe it thinks it's an iterable (e.g. not enough information to infer array), so $x is initially the empty type, and there was code treating $x like a boolean prior to that
    Or even the file in question. It's possible the union type caching is the issue, but more likely it's something about the code in question
    Adrian
    @adrian-enspired

    thanks for the link! i knew there was something for it... should have looked harder.

    regarding the PhanTypeInvalidRightOperandOfBitwiseOp question, this reproduces it for me

    function example(int $a, array $bs) {
      foreach ($bs as $b => $s) {
        $x = ($a & $b === $a);
      }
    }
    i can add assert(is_int($b)) before the op and it still errors.
    Tyson Andre
    @TysonAndre
    Operator precedence of & and === is a common source of confusion. That gets parsed as $a & ($b === $a).
    phan ±0198a2479⚡ » php internal/dump_fallback_ast.php --php-ast-native '$x = ($a & $b === $a);'
    AST_STMT_LIST [] #1
            0 => AST_ASSIGN [] #1
                    var => AST_VAR [] #1
                            name => x
                    expr => AST_BINARY_OP [BINARY_BITWISE_AND] #1
                            left => AST_VAR [] #1
                                    name => a
                            right => AST_BINARY_OP [BINARY_IS_IDENTICAL] #1
                                    left => AST_VAR [] #1
                                            name => b
                                    right => AST_VAR [] #1
                                            name => a
    So your code is buggy and should be $x = ($a & $b) === $a;
    PHP bases the precedence on C, which is the same for those operators
    Adrian
    @adrian-enspired
    oh holy cow : [ i even had the parenthesis on a similar statement in another function.
    thanks. sorry to bother.