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  • Jan 31 2019 22:17
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Brian Gates
@brian-gates
var log = function(){ console.log(arguments); };

var test = R.nAry(2, R.tap(log));

test(1,2); // expected { '0': 1, '1': 2 } got { '0': 1 }
what am I doing wrong here?
David Chambers
@davidchambers
@brian-gates, what's your high-level objective?
Brian Gates
@brian-gates
accept two params and call those into a function as an array
basically exactly my example up there
test(1,2) -> log([1, 2])
This message was deleted
David Chambers
@davidchambers
var test = R.apply(log); might be what you're after.
Brian Gates
@brian-gates
the opposite, I think
I want to convert the arguments into an array, not the other way around
but
unapply doesn't seem to do what I want either
jk it does.
I swear I tested that
my example was terrible, sorry
var log = function(){ console.log(arguments); };

var test = R.unapply(log);

test(1,2);// { '0': [ 1, 2 ] }
that's what I was going after, I'm too tired apparently
thanks :)
Fulton Byrne
@Freyert
Anyone have any recommendations for writing documentation?
David Chambers
@davidchambers
API documentation do you mean, @Freyert?
Fulton Byrne
@Freyert
Correct
David Chambers
@davidchambers
I'm pleased you got something working, @brian-gates.
Fulton Byrne
@Freyert
For instance, what is Ramda using, and would you prefer something else?
David Chambers
@davidchambers
I prefer Transcribe, but I'm biased. ;)
Fulton Byrne
@Freyert
That's actually what I was looking for haha
Where can I see some examples?
I love the terseness of the markdown
David Chambers
@davidchambers
Here's a nice example.
Fulton Byrne
@Freyert
Actual output as well?
so simple to read
Holy cow
I need to go home and read through this source code
David Chambers
@davidchambers
The output is README.md.
Fulton Byrne
@Freyert
And then you can mark it down however you like
I see
I'm trying to come up with a good strategy for internal documentation.
Something we could host locally
And would be searchable, and categorized
David Chambers
@davidchambers
Ah, that sounds broader in scope than Transcribe. I don't have a recommendation for you, in that case.
Fulton Byrne
@Freyert
How do you use Transcribe yourself? Do you just CTRL+F?
David Chambers
@davidchambers
When I want to read the documentation for a given function, do you mean?
Fulton Byrne
@Freyert
Yes haha sorry
zoned out
David Chambers
@davidchambers
I generally enter the GitHub URL. For example: https://github.com/plaid/sanctuary#fromMaybe.
Hardy Jones
@joneshf
@scott-christopher that map == chain seems off to me.
Scott Christopher
@scott-christopher
Ah, the difference is yield* compared to yield
Hardy Jones
@joneshf
Oh wow
I totally missed that
sorry
Scott Christopher
@scott-christopher
yield* is like a flat-mapish operator