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Gregg Irwin
@greggirwin
@lepinekong_twitter, are you intentionally ignoring me?
viayuve
@viayuve
now I think, I must hold my horses before I move app to production server.
in windows it works, in mac it does hang up and stop other triggers.
Greg T
@gltewalt
@viayuve Can you move your info to red/bugs so gurus can help investigate?
viayuve
@viayuve
how can i identify what is causing me issue ?
okay @gltewalt
Gabriele Santilli
@giesse
@nedzadarek Red barely existed when I started with Topaz. Not to mention, I had a proof-of-concept R2-like interpreter written in Javascript around 2007.
Contrary to Red, Topaz did not have REBOL compatibility as a goal, so it has a number of major differences.
In any case, the idea of a REBOL-like or REBOL-inspired language running in the browser (or any other platform with a JS VM of any sort) is anything but new, and has been historically very unpopular.
Petr Krenzelok
@pekr
unpopular? I can easily claim, that Rebol's non presence in a browser is one of its failures.
nedzadarek
@nedzadarek
@giesse I see, thank you for the information.
Gabriele Santilli
@giesse
@pekr, unpopular with this crowd at least :)
GiuseppeChillemi
@GiuseppeChillemi

What should I expect using context?

If I use it on an object word I get ?function?. This is not so meningful to me.
I ask it beacuse I wish to find which functions returns what: I wish to compare if the context of words inside block is the same of the result when using extract, or contexts of words passed between funtions, or if words setted into a foreach loop maintain the context of the foreach block argument.

hiiamboris
@hiiamboris
you're probably using it not on object's word but on it's associated value
GiuseppeChillemi
@GiuseppeChillemi
AA: 1
Context? 'AA
( pardon, I am in mobile )
hiiamboris
@hiiamboris
>> o: object [w: 123  probe context? 'w]  ()
make object! [
    w: 123
]
no function as you can see
can't tell you more without seein the code
Toomas Vooglaid
@toomasv
@GiuseppeChillemi Or, if you have bound words somewhere else, e.g.:
a: [b]
o: object [b: 2]
bind a o
context? a/1
;== make object! [
;    b: 2
;]
GiuseppeChillemi
@GiuseppeChillemi
@toomasv Yesterday it was too late. I was using PRINT instead of PROBE to get the context.
Boleslav Březovský
@rebolek
Careful with that, print evaluates
GiuseppeChillemi
@GiuseppeChillemi
@toomasv I still not undestand how to get the context of a word inside a block.
@rebolek Yes, I have discovered it with long consolle output !
Toomas Vooglaid
@toomasv
@GiuseppeChillemi If you have bound words in the block, you can ask context? of these words, as in above example.
Also:
>> a: [context? 'b]
== [context? 'b]
>> o: object [b: 2]
== make object! [
    b: 2
]
>> bind a o
== [context? 'b]
>> do a
== make object! [
    b: 2
]
Greg T
@gltewalt
If you’re wondering how to get the name that a value is set to... values are anonymous.
nedzadarek
@nedzadarek
@GiuseppeChillemi to add to @toomasv answer:
you just need to extract a word!. As Toomas noted, you can use /n syntax (arr: [a b c] arr/3; c) or using pick (pick [a b c] 3). You can evenfindit (first find [a b c] 'a`). As fair I remember, it's like any other way to extract values.
@toomasv has binding changed? I remember saving bindings (e.g. arr: [a b c] arr: bind arr context [a: 1 b: 2 c: 3]). I don't think it's necessary now.
Toomas Vooglaid
@toomasv
@nedzadarek No need to "save". Bindings are changed in-place. But you can bind a (deep) copy with bind/copy.
nedzadarek
@nedzadarek
@toomasv I see.
@toomasv @GiuseppeChillemi As fair I know bind binds any-word!:
>> arr: [a a: 'a :a] 
== [a a: 'a :a]
>> reduce to-word probe first (bind arr context [a: 42])
a
== 42
>> reduce to-word probe second (bind arr context [a: 42])
a:
== 42
>> reduce to-word probe third (bind arr context [a: 42])
'a
== 42
>> reduce to-word probe fourth (bind arr context [a: 42])
:a
== 42
GiuseppeChillemi
@GiuseppeChillemi
Here:
y: [b c d]
probe context? y/1
I expected a result from context? but basically I was wrong. I supposed B has some context
Boleslav Březovský
@rebolek
But there is result.
Also,
>> equal? system/words context? y/1
== true
nedzadarek
@nedzadarek
@GiuseppeChillemi don't probe it - main context is huge to print
GiuseppeChillemi
@GiuseppeChillemi
@rebolek , yes there is a result.

Also I expected a result from:

z: make object! [b: 0 c: 1 d: 2]
probe context? z/1

But I get an error

*** Script Error: cannot access 1 in path z/1
*** Where: context?
*** Stack: probe 
>>
Boleslav Březovský
@rebolek
z is object, there's no z/1
this has nothing to do with context?
GiuseppeChillemi
@GiuseppeChillemi

@gltewalt

If you’re wondering how to get the name that a value is set to... values are anonymous.

This is now clear to me.

@rebolek I expected z/1 returning the first word in the object and returning the object Z itself as result of context?
nedzadarek
@nedzadarek
@GiuseppeChillemi I guess you have used the Rebol to have such expectations:
z: object [a: 1 b: 2]
first z
; == [self a b]
second z
;== [make object! [
;        a: 1
;        b: 2
;    ] 1 2]
Boleslav Březovský
@rebolek
@nedzadarek certainly not, first z does return words-of, not first word.
@GiuseppeChillemi Ah, you wanted this:
>> z: make object! [b: 0 c: 1 d: 2]
== make object! [
    b: 0
    c: 1
    d: 2
]
>> w: words-of z
== [b c d]
>> w/1
== b
>> context? w/1
== make object! [
    b: 0
    c: 1
    d: 2
]
nedzadarek
@nedzadarek

@rebolek

@nedzadarek certainly not, first z does return words-of, not first word.

I mean that only the Rebol allows you to use integer indexes (well, first and second) to retrieve words & values respectively. The Red is more descriptive (-of functions).

Boleslav Březovský
@rebolek
@nedzadarek right, it does, however @GiuseppeChillemi writes: I expected z/1 returning the first word in the object..., so this has nothing to do with first and second (and third also, IIRC) functionality in Rebol.
nedzadarek
@nedzadarek
@rebolek Maybe he saw obj: make object! [...] ... second obj. So, he thought "I can use integer indexes on objects".
After some time he tried it on the Red (not remembering exact details), expecting above.
Boleslav Březovský
@rebolek
:)
GiuseppeChillemi
@GiuseppeChillemi
Yes, when I see a block I think automatically I can get its elements via integers
Boleslav Březovský
@rebolek
And you of course can. However, object is not a block.
GiuseppeChillemi
@GiuseppeChillemi
I always think that there is an uniform access method in RED or REBOL so I apply the knoledge of blocks in object as when I probe them they actually seem an block with a "make object!" just before.