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  • Apr 12 20:44
    wd15 review_requested #1242
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  • Apr 02 21:11

    wd15 on nist-pages

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    pfhub commented #1240
Stephen DeWitt
@stvdwtt
That choices in the input file (for any code) can cause a calculation to take orders of magnitude longer and be less accurate is a useful warning I think
Daniel Schwen
@dschwen
Also, it is hard to know whether the spread is due to a spread in uploader expertise, or due to low user friendlyness (if that is the point to be made here...)
Issue #500 proposes tags for uploads
one tag could be the "level" of familiarity with the code of the uploader
Stephen DeWitt
@stvdwtt
That makes sense to me.
Daniel Schwen
@dschwen
And that might just be a pill to swallow. If you are not familiar with MOOSE you will not get optimal results.
I have a suspicion that this is common problem for scientific codes.
And part of the problem could be that it is easy to get started, where other codes maybe put up a barrier through a steeper learning curve that prevents a quick "shot from the hip"
Stephen DeWitt
@stvdwtt
You’re right, that is hard to know. They can also be hard to separate — if you run an implicit code you need to work harder to pick a time step, choosing that correctly is some mix of expertise and user-friendlieness
Daniel Schwen
@dschwen
preconditioning is a big one for implicit codes
Stephen DeWitt
@stvdwtt
Right, that’s a better example
Daniel Schwen
@dschwen
that is voodoo science even to me
I go with experience
We are still discovering things that make our simulations orders of magnitude faster. Just yesterday @laagesen found a neat trick to speed up phase field simulations with source terms by a factor of >100 (which sounds insane...)
Stephen DeWitt
@stvdwtt
That does sound insane (nice job @laagesen)
drjamesawarren
@drjamesawarren
Wow.
There’s some stuff on operator spitting I did a while ago that might be relevant. Could be fun to discuss at the workshop.
Daniel Schwen
@dschwen
That does not sound sanitary
drjamesawarren
@drjamesawarren
Heh
Daniel Wheeler
@wd15
Regarding the efficiency plots, maybe the the wall time should be reported at a particular simulation time. I think we should change that.
Daniel Wheeler
@wd15
Possible having the plot could contain some more information such as cpu time and number of cores. Also, wall time versus inverse of the number of cores as another plot so bottom left corner indicates better performance per core.
I do need to implement tags. It would help a lot.
A. M. Jokisaari
@amjokisaari
Wow, that was a lot to catch up on. I think we need to set aside some time at the meeting to have this discussion. Daniel and/or Steve, perhaps one of you can bring a summary of the points discussed here to the meeting and we can then brainstorm additional alternative?
Stephen DeWitt
@stvdwtt
@dschwen, since you kicked this off, I’ll defer to you if you want to summarize this at the meeting
Daniel Schwen
@dschwen
sure, I can do that
Daniel Schwen
@dschwen
The agenda schedules the pfhub update to thursday morning (small timeslot followed by the @tonkmr presentation). We should probably rather talk about this in a breakout session.
Daniel Wheeler
@wd15
@amjokisaari, any chance that you can sign off on the paper (or not)? I implemented most of your changes.
A. M. Jokisaari
@amjokisaari
I'll take a look now. Is there a PDF built?
oh, i see you added it :+1:
Daniel Wheeler
@wd15
Thanks to both you and Mike on the feedback. It improved things a lot.
Daniel Wheeler
@wd15
@guyer set up a Slack group for us all to try, pfhub.slack.com
I'll try and add as many as I can
sulemansulemansuleman
@sulemansulemansuleman
hello every one . I need a PFC phase field crystal modeling code in matlab language if possible some one give me clue
Daniel Schwen
@dschwen
This book has matlab / octave examples.
sulemansulemansuleman
@sulemansulemansuleman
yes i am doing in matlab \but at initial days still dnt know exactly what to do how to write PFC code
if someone guide me \i will be very thankfull
Daniel Wheeler
@wd15
@sulemansulemansuleman, I would recommend asking on Stackexchange. You're more likely to get a variety of answers.
Daniel Schwen
@dschwen

still dnt know exactly what to do how to write PFC code

Which is why I suggested a book to you. Do you have an advisor you could ask questions like this?

Trevor Keller
@tkphd
@sulemansulemansuleman, there are some decent reference implementations on GitHub, e.g., https://github.com/eimrek/phase-field-crystal-mpi. PFC is not a trivial class of models, so read up before modifying for your purposes.
sulemansulemansuleman
@sulemansulemansuleman
ok thanks for every one
Phobee
@Phoebejoe_gitlab
Hi
tdio123
@tdio123
Is there someone do this project with Mathematica AceGen FEM or is there some code about this? thanks
RealGaneshIyer
@RealGaneshIyer
Hi there. I am new to PFM and want some guidance to get started. My expertise is in the fields of solid mechanics and FEM. I have fair knowledge in solid state Phase equilibria/transformations and material thermodynamics. How should I go about learning the technique and start solving some basic problems? Thanks in advance.
Daniel Wheeler
@wd15
Hi @RealGaneshIyer, you might try some of Peter Voorhees lectures to get started with theory, https://pages.nist.gov/pfhub/wiki/voorhees-lectures/
You might want to try solving the Cahn-Hilliard equation with some of these codes, https://pages.nist.gov/pfhub/codes/
Daniel Wheeler
@wd15
Also, a code in Python based on http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevE.72.055701
So, Cahn-Hilliard is the first "benchmark" problem on the PFHub website. After that, maybe try working on some of the other benchmarks. The dendrite problem is a good one as it has quite a lot of example codes available.