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  • Aug 04 15:41
    tkphd closed #1095
  • Aug 04 15:41
    tkphd closed #1422
  • Aug 04 15:40
    tkphd closed #1036
  • Aug 04 15:40
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  • Aug 04 15:40

    tkphd on master

    add ampe to list of codes fix broken link to fipy_8a_fakeā€¦ add pfhub citation to readme and 3 more (compare)

  • Jul 22 20:02
    pfhub commented #1423
  • Jul 22 19:59
    wd15 labeled #1423
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  • Jul 22 19:54
    wd15 labeled #1095
  • Jul 22 19:54
    wd15 labeled #1036
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    wd15 assigned #1095
tdio123
@tdio123
Is there someone do this project with Mathematica AceGen FEM or is there some code about this? thanks
RealGaneshIyer
@RealGaneshIyer
Hi there. I am new to PFM and want some guidance to get started. My expertise is in the fields of solid mechanics and FEM. I have fair knowledge in solid state Phase equilibria/transformations and material thermodynamics. How should I go about learning the technique and start solving some basic problems? Thanks in advance.
Daniel Wheeler
@wd15
Hi @RealGaneshIyer, you might try some of Peter Voorhees lectures to get started with theory, https://pages.nist.gov/pfhub/wiki/voorhees-lectures/
You might want to try solving the Cahn-Hilliard equation with some of these codes, https://pages.nist.gov/pfhub/codes/
Daniel Wheeler
@wd15
Also, a code in Python based on http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevE.72.055701
So, Cahn-Hilliard is the first "benchmark" problem on the PFHub website. After that, maybe try working on some of the other benchmarks. The dendrite problem is a good one as it has quite a lot of example codes available.
Ayron
@ZhigangPu
Hello everyone, I wonder is there some book about phase field that has exercises? I've read books <Phase-field methods in Material Science and Engineering> written by Nikolas Provatas and I also downloaded some sample code to play with but I still feel that I don't really understand phase field, I think I may need some exercises to help me understand.
Daniel Wheeler
@wd15
Maybe try Peter Voorhees lectures, https://pages.nist.gov/pfhub/wiki/voorhees-lectures/
Also, see some of the links above to get started with implementing something
ahmad681
@ahmad681
How do I get notifications about semianrs, workshops, events, etc in the future? Thanks
Daniel Wheeler
@wd15
Hi @ahmad681, I think it's mostly by word of mouth, which isn't very open. This is unfortunate. We should probably mail out prospective dates to the pfhub mailing list. Probably best to sign up for the mailing list, https://pages.nist.gov/pfhub/mailing_list/
I'll try and ensure updates go the mailing list regarding future workshops.
ahmad681
@ahmad681
@wd15 thanks a lot, I will do that. I am second year grad student at Purdue. What I am working on is developing phase field models for films growth. I would like to really get involved with the phase field community, collaborating, sharing ideas, and making connections as well.
Anurag Tripathi
@Anurag97385791_twitter
I am new to phase field modelling. I wanted to know how can I install the commercial version of OpenPhase i.e., OpenPhase Studio. Can anyone please guide me through.
Daniel Wheeler
@wd15
OpenPhase clearly is not supported in the same way as a regular open source code (i.e. github presence, submit issues, user engagement). If you are set on using OpenPhase then maybe concact the authors via the form on their webpage, https://openphase-solutions.com/.
Seeing that OpenPhase seems to be only marginally open source then you might want to try one of the other codes from here, https://pages.nist.gov/pfhub/codes/
Anurag Tripathi
@Anurag97385791_twitter
Thank you @wd15 .
Tienlm95
@tienbk95
Hi all, can you suggest to me some courses that help me understand more phase field method?
Trevor Keller
@tkphd
Hi there,
We have a collection of lectures by Peter Voorhees in the wiki:
https://pages.nist.gov/pfhub/wiki/voorhees-lectures/
4 replies
Wei Zhang
@waynezw0618
Hello, I am wondering whether there is open source code which support compressible navier stokes and phase field model ? I am looking forward a tool for simulating the cavitation in rarefaction wave.
2 replies
sqmonismith
@sqmonismith
Hello, I am currently working on some phase field problems using MEMPHIS; to that end, I would like to submit our benchmark results for 6.a (electrostatics). When I tried to submit, there was an issue with the portal. Is it still possible to submit results for this problem? Thanks!
Daniel Wheeler
@wd15
Yes, it is possible to submit. Submit with a pull-request on github.
First clone the pfhub repository: https://github.com/usnistgov/pfhub
Fill it out as best you can and I can help correct things in the PR. Store the data online somewhere accessible.
Submit in a new directory in _data/simulations.
I can help fix any issues in the pull-request.
sqmonismith
@sqmonismith
Dr. Wheeler, thanks for your thorough response. Per your instructions, I copied/filled out the YAML file and submitted a pull request. Please let me know if I've made any mistakes. Thanks!
Daniel Wheeler
@wd15
Hi @sqmonismith, I'm not seeing a pull request at https://github.com/usnistgov/pfhub/pulls. Which repository did you do a PR to?
sqmonismith
@sqmonismith
@wd15 the current repository is listed as pfhub
Daniel Wheeler
@wd15
I'm sure what you mean by "the current repository is listed as pfhub". Where exactly is the P
sqmonismith
@sqmonismith
Dr. Wheeler, sorry it looks like the pull request was only to my local fork. I just tried again and it seems to be listed in https://github.com/usnistgov/pfhub/pulls
Daniel Wheeler
@wd15
Great, thanks! Sorry about the incomplete reply. I'm not sure what happened there. I'll communicate further in the PR.
Daniel Wheeler
@wd15
@sqmonismith the PR is ready for you to look at, see my comment, https://github.com/usnistgov/pfhub/pull/1321#issuecomment-1117565912
Abdur_Azad
@Rahman786Foam
Hello Dr. Daniel Wheeler, Hope you are keeping well.
I have one question regarding the Benchmark 3a.1 (dendritic growth in 2D), what is the value of timestep and mesh size (I assume dx==dy=1) used in the benchmark problem
Kindly let me know thank you in Advance
Abdur, PhD student, University College Dublin, Ireland
@wd15 @Rahman786Foam
Hello Dr. Daniel Wheeler, Hope you are keeping well.
I have one question regarding the Benchmark 3a.1 (dendritic growth in 2D), what is the value of timestep and mesh size (I assume dx==dy=1) used in the benchmark problem
Kindly let me know thank you in Advance
Abdur, PhD student, University College Dublin, Ireland
Daniel Wheeler
@wd15
Hi @Rahman786Foam, the question depends a lot on which type of numerical scheme is used. The dendrite benchmark paper has some discussion in the "Numerical Methods" section, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.commatsci.2018.03.015. On the PFHub website, https://pages.nist.gov/pfhub/simulations/3a.1/, there are a number of different implementations. You can follow the links to get the implementation details for each of those to try and figure out what time step and grid spacing was used. Some of those are adaptive so won't have a fixed time step or grid spacing. I've run the dendrite simulation with a grid spacing of 1 and a time step of 0.1 with an implicit, fixed grid scheme. Looking at the paper, for an explicit scheme with dx=0.4, the maximum dt is 0.009. I hope that helps.
Martin Minar
@dudris
Dear Dr. Wheeler,
are there any thoughts for expanding the list of benchmarks? I have been working on multi-phse field model including inclination dependence of interface energy. When validating my implementation I simulated the Wulff shape in 2-phase system and developed a quantitative methodology applicable to any model simulating the anisotorpic isolated particle. Besides that, I think that there should be a benchmark comparing results of triple junction angles among different models (also worked on that). Would you or somebody else be interested in hearing more?
Kind regards,
Martin Minar, PhD student @ KU Leuven, Belgium
Daniel Wheeler
@wd15
Hi @dudris, yes, I would be interested in hearing more. Could we perhaps move this discussion to a GitHub discussion as I think it's a little easier to have a more context based discussion (we're going to close down Gitter soon). I've taken the liberty of copying and pasting your question into that forum -- https://github.com/usnistgov/pfhub/discussions/1415
Please folllow up there. Thanks!