These are chat archives for weaverbel/LibraryCarpentry

17th
Nov 2016
Peter Neish
@peterneish
Nov 17 2016 02:33
Just tried out @ostephens API lesson with about 20 of our librarians and it worked very well. A couple had issues with getting into their google account and there were one or two issues with cutting and pasting of the code, but mostly it went smoothly and the feedback was all positive.
Belinda Weaver
@weaverbel
Nov 17 2016 03:38
@ostephens 's lessons are the BOMB ;-)
Richard Vankoningsveld
@richyvk
Nov 17 2016 06:46
@brendam Hi. I've started working through the library-python lesson. Thought I'd make notes on each lesson - done lesson 00 - comments at data-lessons/library-python#32
@brendam I'm happy to do a redraft as a PR if you'd like to consider it? Hope you don't mind the comments. I took the view of a python newb and what they might like to know.
Brenda Moon
@brendam
Nov 17 2016 07:08
@richyvk I agree with your comments - we've been rushing to convert the data cap ecology lesson in time to deliver it today.
I'm going to go through the operators and get people to practice. With the types,
Brenda Moon
@brendam
Nov 17 2016 07:13
I plan to frame that around the fussyness of programming synyax - that using different brackets can be important.
Do beginners need to know about tuples?
@richyvk im sure @mkuzak would welcome pull requests
Brenda Moon
@brendam
Nov 17 2016 09:11
@richyvk I think for library carpentry it would be good to remove some of the numeric examples from the lesson and introduce some working with text ones. At this stage didn’t do that because it was too big a change in the time available.
Richard Vankoningsveld
@richyvk
Nov 17 2016 10:33
@brendam All sounds good then. I might redraft lesson 00 then and submit it - stand by for that @mkuzak
Richard Vankoningsveld
@richyvk
Nov 17 2016 10:42
@brendam I like all you've said too. I do think beginners might like to know about tuples - I really came to see their benefit to prevent SQL injections etc for web apps. But, they are much faster than lists too right? I like the idea of text based examples. I haven't really got my head around the rest of the module yet though. My initial thought was pandas is an interesting choice for a beginners class, but I assume that's due to the data centric nature of the course right? To move away from that would mean pretty much writing a new course too I'd say.
I have been thinking about some of the ways librarians might like to use Python too though, for the basis of a course, or other Python based courses. I think web scraping would be good. Also databases. SQLite being to obvious one, but even a NoSQL option - I've recently discovered TinyDB (https://github.com/msiemens/tinydb) which is awesome - so easy to use. Maybe good for a course, or part of a course? Maybe a web app one too - I use Flask (http://flask.pocoo.org/) - it's pretty awesome. Anyway, food for thought...
Brenda Moon
@brendam
Nov 17 2016 10:47
I’d still use pandas - more pandas :) I do a lot of text processing holding the data in pandas.
Owen Stephens
@ostephens
Nov 17 2016 17:14
@peterneish glad that it worked! Any suggestions for improvements v welcome
@weaverbel too kind. But I'll take it :smile:
Owen Stephens
@ostephens
Nov 17 2016 17:47
@richyvk a web scraping course is one that has been suggested/discussed a bit - but not specifically python based
Ryan Johnson
@remerjohnson
Nov 17 2016 17:52
A problem re: linked data is similar to before an app store existed. You can't have a killer app when there's no infrastructure so it becomes a chicken and egg problem. There are lots of incredible ideas for apps based on linked data, but the focus now is how you can maintain your data much easier (the modeling and reconciliation of legacy data however is incredibly difficult).
To be honest I see it having huge impacts all around the academy, like how it affect academic publishing
https://dokie.li/
John Chodacki
@chodacki
Nov 17 2016 22:20
I had my meeting with the SWC/DC folks about getting a instructor training set up with a focus on Librarian community. It looks like we are set to go. Still finalizing, but it looks like May 3-4 in Portland, OR.
It would great to get more popel on this list certified. And for us to spread the word in our groups. Once we have it finalized, I can tweet it out through our twitter handle.
Belinda Weaver
@weaverbel
Nov 17 2016 22:47
@ostephens I think librarians would like import.io because it's graphical, not command-line based. While we know command line stuff is faster/better, many librarians think it's too hard. If they get a win with a tool like import.io, then they might be ready to look under the hood. I think the 'whatever works' mantra is an important one to remember - it's all about the endgame of stopping them doing slow, time-wasting stuff. How they get there - well, does it matter?
@chodacki Was that meeting with Greg Wilson and Tracy Teal?
John Chodacki
@chodacki
Nov 17 2016 22:47
yep
As I am sure you are aware…to make it successful, they suggest 2 people already certified to be the ones to do this training. your name, @weaverbel came up as an awesome option. Would you be availble to come over for that. We have travel support available for the folks that run the training. Also, maybe @jt14den ? or others on this list that are certified SWC/DC instructors?
John Chodacki
@chodacki
Nov 17 2016 22:54
we talked about the need for more people in our community to become certified. Greg and Tracy said we could fit between 20-30 people. So I am hoping this could be a way for us to really grow ‘certification’ within the LC community.
Richard Vankoningsveld
@richyvk
Nov 17 2016 22:56
@chodacki How does one get certified?
@brendam I'm a total pandas newb, but it looks very cool. I'm sure it has many uses :)
Belinda Weaver
@weaverbel
Nov 17 2016 22:56
@richyvk @chodacki This would be Software carpentry-style instructor training, I imagine?
John Chodacki
@chodacki
Nov 17 2016 22:56
yep
Belinda Weaver
@weaverbel
Nov 17 2016 22:57
@richyvk I am a certified SWC/DC instructor - if you are interested in training, let me know as I might be running training next year. I am doing one 14-15 December but that is full. https://swcarpentry.github.io/instructor-training/
John Chodacki
@chodacki
Nov 17 2016 23:00
@richyvk Its a two-day event (for folks that are deciated to eventually running SWC/DC events) come together and are trained on best practices and SWC/DC approaches to teaching.
Belinda Weaver
@weaverbel
Nov 17 2016 23:04
@chodacki Happy to talk about coming over !!!!!
John Chodacki
@chodacki
Nov 17 2016 23:04
Awesome.
Richard Vankoningsveld
@richyvk
Nov 17 2016 23:05
@chodacki Aha. Using this: http://swcarpentry.github.io/instructor-training/ ? Any plans for this to be made available as an online course? That would be good. Although, no substitute for face to face learning of course. I just came out of a two day train the trainer session so I'm all pumped up to train :)
John Chodacki
@chodacki
Nov 17 2016 23:07
I am not sure of the SWC/DC opinion on having recorded training. I will ask.
Belinda Weaver
@weaverbel
Nov 17 2016 23:09
happy to discuss all this - am in an SWC community call at the moment but I have answers ...
Owen Stephens
@ostephens
Nov 17 2016 23:24
@weaverbel I think a variety of approaches is good. I agree commandline/code is off putting for some
@weaverbel my only issue with import.io is cost once you go beyond the free allocation
Belinda Weaver
@weaverbel
Nov 17 2016 23:26
I agree @ostephens but you can maximise by using your Google ID, then your GitHub, then your Facebook ;-) Also they give BIG discounts for educational use
Owen Stephens
@ostephens
Nov 17 2016 23:27
@weaverbel :smile:
@weaverbel think a screen scraping course could cover several approaches
Belinda Weaver
@weaverbel
Nov 17 2016 23:29
hear hear - I am teaching on next Friday - will be curious to see what issues /questions arise
*teaching one