These are chat archives for whereat/contrib

12th
Apr 2016
Kamal Marhubi
@kamalmarhubi
Apr 12 2016 00:19
I'm really excited by whatsapp's move there
but we'll see how many countries start moving to block it...
aguestuser
@aguestuser
Apr 12 2016 00:22
I'm also dying to know: Facebook just gave up the ability to access the contents of messages of over 1 Billion users. What's in it for Facebook? (Because something's always in it for Facebook, right?)
Kamal Marhubi
@kamalmarhubi
Apr 12 2016 01:13
they already had some amount of end-to-end encryption
also according to this profile on wired, the decision made by whatsapp http://www.wired.com/2016/04/forget-apple-vs-fbi-whatsapp-just-switched-encryption-billion-people/
aguestuser
@aguestuser
Apr 12 2016 01:14
and they're like "we don't care about not seeing text content, becaue the real value is meta data and more users?"
Kamal Marhubi
@kamalmarhubi
Apr 12 2016 01:14
moxie met someone who worked there at some kind of family event
and it went from there
ugh wired and their adblocker nonsense that triggers for tracking protection in firefox
aguestuser
@aguestuser
Apr 12 2016 01:16
hunh. looks like cool article! reading now! regardless want to know: FB (who makes money off selling adds) buys a company who seems legit interested in privacy, who then makes an awesome privacy move like this, and thinks it makes good business sense because _
(fill in the blank...)
the way the tech industry generates/measures value will never cease to astonish me in its complexity. :smile:
Kamal Marhubi
@kamalmarhubi
Apr 12 2016 01:18
"Clearly, WhatsApp has the support of its much larger parent company. Facebook declined to speak specifically for this story. But Koum, after the WhatsApp acquisition, became a member of the Facebook board. “If they were not supportive of us, we wouldn’t be here today,” he says. But this also wasn’t something Facebook imposed on WhatsApp. This is a decision WhatsApp made on its own, before it was acquired. By the time Facebook paid billions of dollars for the company, the transformation was already under way. "
j-ak
@j-ak
Apr 12 2016 03:36
@aguestuser fwiw, I have my own crazy pet theory about what’s in it for fb and apple to defend encryption in their products… you can already use platforms like fb to send money(!!) to people, or entrust apple with your banking info with apple pay. I think they’re looking down the road to a time when maybe they can replace those institutions, which they would need strong encryption for to be trusted
aguestuser
@aguestuser
Apr 12 2016 03:37
@j-ak interesting! and compelling!
Kamal Marhubi
@kamalmarhubi
Apr 12 2016 05:13
I wish I had enough faith in how much the finance industry cares about security :/
Meitar M.
@meitar
Apr 12 2016 06:34
@j-ak That is not a crazy theory. I know for a fact there are a number of pseudo behind-the-scenes partnerships between companies like Apple and PayPal to explicitly obsolete cash.
Also, @aguestuser, remember that Facebook's primary concern right now is getting users to share more personal stuff using its platform. A lot of people have stopped posting the minutia of everyday life on Facebook in favor of, say, Snapchat. Facebook needs that kind of stickiness to stay relevant because a lot of their business that relies on selling user data feeds that back into ad views. If those eyeballs are moving to Snapchat, they're in trouble. By acquiring WhatsApp, it doesn't matter if they can't read the message content, they get all the important metadata for advertising and equally importantly, they get the eyeballs in front of which to put ads (in WhatsApp).
Also, let's not forget the lesson of Microsoft buying Skype. Once upon a time, Skype was pretty secure solution. Then Microsoft deliberately backdoored it by request of law enforcement, and we only found out way later. Since WhatsApp is equally open as Skype (i.e., it is closed), this is a very likely scenario.
Meitar M.
@meitar
Apr 12 2016 06:43
@j-ak E.g., https://boingboing.net/2016/04/10/a-cashless-society-as-a-tool-f.html They've been working on this for a long time, focus groups about stuff like this date back years….
ziggy
@aepyornis
Apr 12 2016 21:26

That's interesting about the cashless society. FB/Apple, in some ways, are the new censors (what the government used to be) . They are government-like entities that control and police our communication networks.

@meitar @aguestuser That metadata argument is compelling. Perhaps they don't even need to read the content to have an avenue for profit-making. Perhaps the metadata is enough. It's enough for the CIA for other purposes:: http://www.nybooks.com/daily/2014/05/10/we-kill-people-based-metadata/